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20130118
20130118
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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
in afghanistan or pakistan or africa 90% of ands come up and i think the as great tragedy we've lost that oral tradition and a rich tradition about folklore and heritage and faith and heritage. to honor that today i'd like to share with you a little story. it's a hard cover book that came out in march of 2006. anybody have a hard cover. wave it up here. you might not want it after i say this. i got to pick the title. three cups of tea but viking told me they would pick the subtitle and they picked one man mission to fight terrorism one school at a time. i objected because obviously there's- ways to fight tear riz m with education but i said i do this to promote peace and i started 8 years before 911 and this is about promoting peace through education. i've worked afghanistan and pakistan many years and i said we need to have a tribal council. i went to manhattan in the fall of 2005 and the big boss of the whole group, nancy shepherd and carlin coburn in publicity. we met in a little room and i stated my case and they said, this is your first book so you need to listen to a few things here. fir
. this is pakistan in 2005. 74,000 people were killed in this earthquake. 18,000 were kids going to school. most of the kids that died were younger and female because they didn't have desks so when the walls started shaking and the roof came down they perished. there was 9,000 schools destroyed or rendered unusable. 1/2 million kids displaced out of school. in earthquake, they call it the coy mot that means this apocalypse. at first there was a very heroic effort. infer natio international community helped. after katrina red cross got 2,000,000 for help and for this earthquake red cross received 6 million dollars. the united states sent in helicopters that conductd the greatest air lift in the history of mankind. moved about 20 thousand on thes in the mountains to keep 1/2 million people a hive during the wintertime. it was very heroic and people were grateful. aid has dropped 70 percent after a year in the wake of that void many jihad and people labeled terrorists have set up camps. this is one here. in pakistan. and in that camp, there are many kids that are previously were going to school and
. nhk world. >>> four days of anti-government protests in pakistan have come to an end. patchari raksawong joins us from bangkok with an update on the situation. patchari, good evening. >> good evening, gene. the protests may be over but the problems remain in pakistan. supporters of influential cleric qadri were demanding the government resign for rampant corruption. it called for the end of demonstrations on thursday. with elections approaching, pakistan faces more difficult weeks ahead. we have this report from islamabad. >> reporter: qadri declared victory in front of supporters as the four-day protest ended thursday. the muslim cleric said the government agreed to dissolve parliament before march 16th and hold free and fair elections within 90 days. protests in islamabad began monday. tens of thousands were there to denounce official corruption and demand resignation of the government. some say the military was covered with supporting qadri who undermined the government ahead of elections. political power has swung back and forth in pakistan between the two main parties. all
conducted by our c.i.a. principally in pakistan, afghanistan and somalia that will be our focus in a few moments. filmmaker and activist robert greenwald is back from pakistan where he tried determine if strikes which washington says are targeted on terrorists are making the u.s. any safer or rather creating a new generation of anti--american militants. now according to pakistani foreign minister, hina rabbani khar, things are making it worse. >> you're creating a thousand more people who will go in the ranks of al-qaeda and the taliban because they feel that when civilians die and illegal activity happens in another territory, it is a hostile one and it is something which has reaction. >> john: we'll have more on drone warfare in a moment. first for the latest on the algerian hostage crisis, we're joined by carlo munoz staff writer, following the story. thank you for following the story tonight. >> thank you for having me. >> john: what is the latest? they say the assault is over but apparently some prisoners are still, in fact, being held. >> that's what -- sort of where the situation
is back from pakistan to determine if strikes are strickly targeted targeted on terrorists are making americans safer or creating a new generation ofant i-american militants. >> you are creating 1,000 morminds in people who will go in the ranks of the al qaeda and taliban and feel illegal activity happens it is a hostile one and something that has reaction. >> we will have more on the dron warfare in a moment. first on the crisis we are joined by the staff writer for defense and national defense for the hill. >> thank you for having me. >> what is the latest? officials say the assault is over but some prisoners are still being held. >> that's where the situation stands right now. you mentioned alger an special forces and the numbers regarding the hostages still on the -- at the facility, it is just as murky as the numbers coming out as who were killed and who escaped. some reports have said as many as two americans are still on the facility under lock and key by the militants who are there. again, reports vary. >> are
was talking about that young man from dubai, or from pakistan, one of 66 countries, 77 countries perhaps where it is still illegal and a crime to be gay. and stewart was talking about the idea that in that airport in dubai, or in pakistan, that that young man who happens to be gay, or that young woman who happens to be lesbian sees on that board, that flight to san francisco, mentions harvey milk, san francisco international airport. the hope is that just like harvey gave hope to that young man from altuna, pennsylvania, we as a city can give hope to that young man and had young woman from the 77 countries. the timing is especially important for me as a member of the lgbt community. we are at a crossroads in history of lgbt right in this country. in a few months our united states supreme court will be deciding a number of cases that at their core go to the very question of whether or not we as members of the lgbt community are equal under the constitution and under the laws of this country. and what a better time for the city and county of san francisco to send a message that recognizes the
pakistani cleric tahir-ul qadri. many in pakistan were held breathless. he was inside the bomb-proof containeder qadri stayed the whole rally. this happened after both sides created insult and a war of words played out on local tv channels. the minister was part of a government delegation that negotiated an end to the protest. opposition party in the coalition government after the long march declaration, cannot take on the name of the prime minister on their own. none of qadri's demands were met and the commission has not been dissolved and the election committee will function in the same way it always has. qadri has remained controversial due to his motives and finances but forced the government to listen to his commands and they criticized the government for allowing thousands in the capitol. but that those in charge should be held accountable. >> all the people who are elected in the parliaments are servants of the public and those who are elected should never forget that they are the servants. >> the government had warned if anything happened to women and children involved
laden and headquartered in pakistan probably matter a lot less now than a few years ago but what you have seen is that as we pit al qaeda in the core area in afghanistan and pakistan it splintered outward and moved outward. and now are you seeing, you know, like a virus trying to find a body in which it can find a weak host. it's moving out and becoming more powerful in places like yemen, somalia, libya, now mali. so it's moving further and further a field and there are so many weak states because this is where terrorists te rt. they take root in failed states there are so many failed states in africa it is not just mali there are a lot of other places and now increasingly in north africa too because of the upheavals that we've seen in the last several years. there's very weak states that cannot resist the incursions of these islamist terrorist groups so we are actually seeing an al qaeda which is morphing and changing an remains very dangerous i think but the danger is taking different forms from what it was when it was more centrally run and tightly controlled out of pakistan. that
entire families including women and children. >> new demands come as pakistan's chief anti- corruption official refused the supreme court order to a rust -- arrest the prime minister over lack of evidence. m in the u.s. president's gun control proposals face an uncertain future. there's no majority in either house of congress with resistance from both republicans and democrats. gun supporters have also launched an advertising campaign against obama's move. the proposals including a ban on assault weapons in response to last month's school massacre in newtown. >> bush fires continue to rage in australia. dozens of homes have been destroyed, and firefighters are struggling to keep the situation under control. more fires are expected this weekend as even higher temperatures and winds are forecast. >> in indonesia, heavy monsoon rains have triggered severe flooding in much of the capital, paralyzing daily lives. at least four people are reported dead, and thousands have had to evacuate their homes. >> authorities have been setting up emergency shelters, and have faced the flood alert -- ra
their sponsor, u.s. postal service. al jazeera, los angeles. >> protests in the pakistan capital have ended. the government reached a deal with the leader of the demonstrators. farmers in peru are putting the agricultural future of the country in jeopardy. >> if you are crossing the u.k. right now, you know is snowing. that will continue through friday. toward scotland, the tigers are love in the snow. they are meant for this type of weather. temperatures got down to - 4. these tigers can handle up to - 40 degrees because of their thick coat. toward saturday, things will be clearing across the u.k. down here is where the rain is going to be a major problem, especially in northern portugal and northern spain. we expect to see up to 150 kiloliters of rain in the next few days. across northern africa, who did see some clouds across libya. it is clearing out across benghazi. toward tripoli, which expect to see -- we expect to see 20 as well. that will last the next couple days. toward nigeria, we expect to see rain the next few days. down the mountain. we are determined to stop them. >> saturda
and the soviets. from the pakistan border to the atlantic ocean, you will have something like this, get ready for it and deal with it. >> are they the same ideologically as al qaeda in iraq? >> there are experts that can talk about that. by and large what they represent is extreme for the political islamic theological movements including using violence with anybody that disagree with them. that is what is in common for all of these organizations. calling them al qaeda is loose association. a few years earlier, they invited the city terrorists in iraq to join them as well. so you get these offshoots that are only loosely connected organizations. but they do have a similar theological and political agenda. >> how much of a threat do they represent to americans here? >> of algeria is an important energy exporter and an important country. this is a threat to of jury out. we see the expansion of rebels and these groups coming in, this is a potent threat and a huge area that needs to be dealt with. >> to syria where the bbc team has found evidence of a massacre that takes place on the edge of palms
country elsewhere. >> right. although, when that didn't matter in pakistan, when they went after osama bin laden. the united states seems to go in when they want to go in. >> you know, in a situation like pakistan, where they took unilateral action, they were afraid, obviously, that the grade would have been compromised, had they let the local government know. this is a different situation now, and we've been working closely with the algerians, and i don't expect that this would be a unilateral type of situation. but as my colleague was saying, i know the offers are on the table, that, you know, any resources that can be brought to bear, to help the algerians resolve this thing are going to be readily available. >> all right. >> and this is a situation, quite frankly, that we might have been able to see coming. the person that was actually bearing responsibility for this, mokhtar belmokhtar actually made a video about a month ago saying, attacks are coming, expect it. so in essence, we should have been circling the wagons, expecting something like this to happen. >> all right. well, don an
that is not -- if we are l done facing it in mali, algeria, somalia, pakistan, looking at it as kind of separate issues, t is all one movement, all sol -- self perpetuating, and it is all motivated by our intervention. the french have united a very disparate group of islamist organizations and molly by intervening there. lou: and as michael is it out, the united states debated, as he characterized, and by the way, i am not sure that the national media even confronts that certain reality that the united states has lost. those are not words that trip easily off the american time. >> no, but these are the consistent notions, perceptions. absolutely. if you listen to them, read their statements, including the few weeks ago, you pretty much convinced that we have been defeated. we have been defeated in benghazi, and now, because you may see in a few weeks, statements by factions say we are now fighting the french. does not matter if they lose people on the ground. they're fighting now. the international community, of course, in this issue. the most important thing in my perspective is, who are we fighting?
and the traditions and the moroccans. in england, they don't know what to do about all the indians and the pakistan's and the jamaicans. in the united states, they don't know what to do about all the latin americans. those were precisely the former colonies of those in pyres. with the ending of world war ii and with the independence movements that developed throughout asia and africa and latin america, the peoples of those former colonial countries are coming to the metropolis, and they're changing, transforming the very composition of this nation's. and so that, for us, the u.s., it's not even -- were not dealing with this immigration "problem" alone. england has an immigration problem. france and germany have immigration problems. it is the harvest of the empire's that made those countries so wealthy. the capital came, but now the people are coming as well. >> the last clip we played was of archbishop romero, march 24, 1980. yourself are from el salvador, an immigrant here in the united states. >> this is one of the reasons why we produced this film and why we feel so strongly about it. as one po
and if things get dicey for them in pakistan, they move to mali or algeria. they seem to be pretty good at movement. bigger question, should we do anything about that or do we just let them brazenly go unobstructed? >> we have to decide why we have the problem. if we decide it's spontaneous and they hate americans and there is al-qaeda that don't like our prosperity and they don't like our freedoms. you keep chasing them. if the problem of these threats toward us and disruption is because we're involved and the answer is be less involved. >> neil: what it is more about than that? what if they really do hate us and they really all about whatever the over tures. they can't stand it. they want us dead. >> they might ask the same question. we brought up a lot of hatred to go 6,000 miles away and kill people with drones. this is where the conflict is coming. we have to beat the drums of war in this hatred and go and do these things and then all of a sudden we have an epidemic of suicides of american soldiers that come back -- what am i doing over here shooting drone missiles and little kids
at the moment. afghanistan, iraq, the covert campaigns in pakistan and yemen and generally we don't see civilian suffering on the front pages of the newspaper and doesn't lead the nightly news so it's important for americans to moe what their wars mean to people overseas. >> yeah. nick, i mean, we are rightly aware of -- you know, we have the vietnam memorial in washington. you have those 59,000 names there. incredibly emotional and moving experience and if you have family members or those your family knew just to walk by and see that's a moving experience. i do wonder sometimes if in this country we don't think enough about the other side of conflicts like this. you are talking about the atrocities in vietnam. you can also talk about the -- think of gulf war in 1991. very few american casualties and lots of iraqi casualties in 1991. think about the sanctions in the 1990s. hundreds of thousands of deaths that can be linked to that, think of afghanistan and the drones. do you think we really are sensitive enough to just sort of the implications of the kinds of deaths that just, you know, follow f
intelligence and drones as we have done in pakistan. we ned to start looking at doing that in northern africa. jenna: we know you are very busy out in virginia. windy virginia, we can hear that on the microphone where the g.o.p. is having their retreat. thank you for your time, stepping out to talk to us about this important story. >> thank you, jenna i appreciate it. jon: some brand-new numbers that show a dramatic drop in cancer deaths in this country. what's behind the decline and how you can stay healthy. that is coming up. plus, the latest on a for reeveryone is talk being about the football star and his fake, dead girlfriend. did sports reporters fumble the ball on this one? our news watch panel is joining us to weigh in. jon: right now the dance world is reeling from a brutal attack on one of its own. the artistic director of one of the world's most renown ballet companies has acid thrown in his face. tpraubg tpraubg has thharris faulkner has the details. >> reporter: he may lose his eyesight. it could have been linked to power struggles at the russian ballet company. 42-year-old forme
about the drug is being dropped on the brothers and sisters in pakistan and somalia and yemen -- the drones being dropped? my voice hollers out, and do not take it with your hand on his bible. what would you say about the poverty in america now beginning with the children and the elderly and our working folks in all colors? not just here, around the world. do not hide and conceal his challenge. as much as i'm glad that barack obama won -- i think that brother mitt romney would have been a catastrophe -- brother newt told the truth about vampire capitalism, but that is the system as a whole. but when barack obama attempts to use that rich tradition of so many struggling to produce that voice that pushed martin in the direction that it did, i get upset. people say we are hating obama. no, we are living the tradition that produced martin luther king jr., and we will not allow it to be sanitized, deodorize, sterilized. we want the subversive power to be heard. that is what we think when he said he is going to put his hand on that bible. [applause] and i'm praying for him. i'm pray
say about the drug is being dropped on the brothers and sisters in pakistan and somalia and yemen -- the drones being dropped? my voice hollers out, and do not take it with your hand on his bible. what would you say about the poverty in america now beginning with the children and the elderly and our working folks in all colors? not just here, around the world. do not hide and conceal his challenge. as much as i'm glad that barack obama won -- i think that brother mitt romney would have been a catastrophe -- brother newt told the truth about vampire capitalism, but that is the system as a whole. but when barack obama attempts to use that rich tradition of so many struggling to produce that voice that pushed martin in the direction that it did, i get upset. people say we are hating obama. no, we are living the tradition that produced martin luther king jr., and we will not allow it to be sanitized, deodorize, sterilized. we want the subversive power to be heard. that is what we think when he said he is going to put his hand on that bible. [applause] and i'm praying for him. i'm pray
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)

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